On This Day in Baseball History July 13, 2000:…

On This Day in Baseball History July 13, 2000: One of the most polarizing figures in the history of American professional sports, George M. Steinbrenner III (July 4, 1930 – July 13, 2010)  who was simply called “The Boss” passed away of a heart attack at the age of 80.

Whether you loved him or hated him, Steinbrenner helped to bring the New York Yankees to prominence after his purchase of the team in 1973. As per Forbes in 2018, the New York Yankees are the fifth most valuable professional sports franchise in the world and the number one valuable professional Baseball franchise, valued at four billion dollars.

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On This Day in Baseball History June 3, 1941: …

On This Day in Baseball History June 3, 1941: 16 years and a day to when he started his famous consecutive games streak, The “Iron Horse” Lou Gehrig succumbed to the illness, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) that would bear his name at 10:00 a..m. Gehrig would pass away at the age of 37. 

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On This Day in Baseball History May 19, 1962: …

On This Day in Baseball History May 19, 1962: Playing in front of a jam packed crowd of 50,100 fans at Dodger Stadium, Stan “The Man” Musial singles off of pitcher Ron Perranoski for his career hit 3,431. In doing so, Musial passed the National League Hit King Honus Wagner. Musial would finish his career with 3,630 hits.

On a side note, after a series of moves in the early 1990′s by Macmillan’s Baseball Encyclopedia, Honus Wagner hits were re-evaluated and found that he actually had 3,420 hits instead of 3,420 hits. The following articles shed more light into the revision of Wagner’s career hits:

Explaining the Honus Wagner Career Hits Discrepancy by Mike Lynch on July 29, 2014 from Sports Reference

Honus Wagner Hit Hard by Revision of Statistics : Hall of Fame: Baseball Encyclopedia drops famed shortstop from 6th to 7th on career hit list and from 26th to 29th in all-time averages. from the Los Angeles Times dated June 18, 1990

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On This Day in History May 17, 2010: One of th…

On This Day in History May 17, 2010: One of the star players of the All American Girl Professional Baseball League, Dorothy “Dottie” Kamenshek (December 21, 1925 – May 17, 2010) passed away at the age of 84. 

Dottie was an outstanding fielder having played first base and was an amazing hitter for the Rockford Peaches. She played for the Peaches from 1943 – 1951 and was immortalized in the movie A League of Their Own being played by Geena Davis. 

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On This Day in Baseball History May 17, 1903: …

On This Day in Baseball History May 17, 1903: Negro League legend James Thomas Bell better known to Baseball fans as Cool Papa Bell (May 17, 1903 – March 7, 1991) is born in Starkville, Mississippi. 

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On This Day in Baseball History May 11, 2016: …

On This Day in Baseball History May 11, 2016: Max Scherzer of the Washington Nationals becomes the fourth pitcher to strike out 20 batters in a nine-inning game by fanning 20 Detroit Tigers. Scherzer pitched for the Tigers from 2010-2014. Scherzer joined Roger Clemens (April 29, 1986/September 18, 1996), Kerry Wood (May 6, 1998) and Randy Johnson (May 8, 2001) on the 20K in a nine inning game list.

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On This Day in Baseball History May 10, 1970: …

On This Day in Baseball History May 10, 1970: 47-year old Atlanta Braves pitcher Hoyt Wilhelm becomes the first pitcher to reach the 1,000 pitching appearance plateau. 

You would have to wonder how many appearances Wilhelm would have had if he had debuted sooner in MLB. Wilhelm was 29-years old when he made his debut for New York Giants in 1952. Wilhelm debuted at that late age due to his service in World War II where he earned a Purple Heart due to injuries during the Battle of the Bulge and spending seven years in the minors. 

Wilhelm is currently 6th on the all time list for pitching appearances with 1,070. Wilhelm was inducted to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1985.

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