PRODcast 164′s Old School Player of the Week: Dennis…

PRODcast 164′s Old School Player of the Week: Dennis Kinney

Dennis Kinney was a spindley, dead-eyed, left-handed reliever who spent five years throwing baseballs poorly for the Indians, Padres, Tigers and A’s. Over those five years, Dennis pitched in 97 games, saved five games, walked nearly as many hitters as he struck out (71BB/75K), posted a 79 ERA+, and racked up -1.2 bWAR.

But he’s not our OSPOTW because he was bad. He’s our pick this week because my man looks straight up TOASTED in most photos. Or maybe he’s just really angry. Or both. Another constant is his Hall-Of-Fame tier disco afro, and a 60-grade creepstache.

PRODcast 163′s Old School Player of the Week: Kevin BuckleyKevin…

PRODcast 163′s Old School Player of the Week: Kevin Buckley

Kevin Buckley (no relation to ETID members Keith and Jordan to my knowledge) was a glistening DH and PH for the Rangers for like 17 minutes in 1984. He played in five games, had nine PAs, got a couple hits, scored a run, walked twice, punched out four times, didn’t sniff the field as a defensive player, and “retired” with a 141 OPS+. Wham, bam, thank you Kevin.

Kevin attended Braintree HS in Massachusetts, which sounds like some bullshit to me, but whatever. He went on to play at U of Maine and appeared in the 1981 College World Series.

Mr. Buckley is our pick for this episode because of his sheen, his lustre, his undeniable moisture. It’s something to behold, but nothing that should overshadow his Stage 2 80s Dad Perm, and dadglasses. He also has teeth. Big ones .. like he’s from the Elway family.

PRODcast 162′s Old School Player of the Week: Bartolomé…


PRODcast 162′s Old School Player of the Week: Bartolomé Fortunato

Bartolomé Fortunato, or “Fortunate Bartholomew”, was a Dominican outfielder-turned-pitcher who spent two seasons in the bigs with the Rays and Mets. In those two seasons (separated by a 2005 on the shelf with a herniated disc), he pitched in 20 games, gave up 20 earned runs, walked 17 batters, gave up 5 dingers, posted an ERA+ of 72 and a WAR of -0.2. He also finished his MLB career with a 2-0 record because pitcher wins are dumb as shit.

Fortunate Bart is probably best known for being a part of the extremely Mets trade that sent then-prospect Scott Kazmir to the Rays for him and Victor Zambrano.

Bart latched on with the Giants organization in 2008, but unfortunately (SWIDT?) he was horrendous at AAA Fresno, and spent the next three years or so wandering through Independent ball, the Mexican league, and the Dominican Winter league. According to his Wikipedia page, he is single and living in the Dominican now, so …

PRODcast 161′s Old School Player of the Week: Mickey KluttsGene…

PRODcast 161′s Old School Player of the Week: Mickey Klutts

Gene Ellis “Mickey” Klutts was a mustachioed, white-guy-with-an-afro infielder-type for the Yankees, A’s, and Blue Jays from 1976 to 1983. During those eight years in the bigs, he played in 199 games, amassed a glorious OPS+ of 85, and was worth 2/10ths of a win. While his on-field exploits were not notable, being one of the 20th Century’s last baseball playing Genes certainly was. Mr. Klutts loved him a windbreaker, a pushbroom ‘stache, a disco ‘fro, and I guess signing his baseball cards twice? For authenticity.

PRODcast 159′s Old School Player of the Week: Freddie…

PRODcast 159′s Old School Player of the Week: Freddie Patek

Freddie Patek (nicknamed “The Flea” or “The Cricket”) was a bite-sized human SS who played 14 seasons in the bigs with the Pirates, Royals, and Angels between 1968 and 1981. Listed at a generous 5’5”, 148 lbs, Patek was the late-20th Century’s version of Jose Altuve, which (like most things from the late-20th century) was not very good. He was worth 24.1 wins over that 14 year career, was an All-Star three times, and actually finished 6th in AL MVP voting in 1971 when he lead the league in triples with 11, caught stealing with 14, and finished the year with 6 HR, 36 RBI, 49 SB, and a .693 OPS?! I remember Patek fondly because the Angels (in a move that was extremely Angels – signing a player well past their prime whether said prime was good or not) had him 1980 and 81, when I was reeeeally getting into baseball, and he was small … like 5-year-old me.

Lookswise, there isn’t much to talk about besides his stature. He’s very small, and kinda looks like a 12-year-old who woke up with stubble one morning. He did have a mustache for a minute, which kinda made him look like the top half of a couple kids trying to sneak into a movie theater in a trench coat. The dadhat is replacement level, the dadlap (thanks to sansabelt is a tick above average for the era), and the hair is pure 70s child actor, which is absolutely fitting.

PRODcast 159′s Old School Player of the Week: Freddie…

PRODcast 159′s Old School Player of the Week: Freddie Patek

Freddie Patek (nicknamed “The Flea” or “The Cricket”) was a bite-sized human SS who played 14 seasons in the bigs with the Pirates, Royals, and Angels between 1968 and 1981. Listed at a generous 5’5”, 148 lbs, Patek was the late-20th Century’s version of Jose Altuve, which (like most things from the late-20th century) was not very good. He was worth 24.1 wins over that 14 year career, was an All-Star three times, and actually finished 6th in AL MVP voting in 1971 when he lead the league in triples with 11, caught stealing with 14, and finished the year with 6 HR, 36 RBI, 49 SB, and a .693 OPS?! I remember Patek fondly because the Angels (in a move that was extremely Angels – signing a player well past their prime whether said prime was good or not) had him 1980 and 81, when I was reeeeally getting into baseball, and he was small … like 5-year-old me.

Lookswise, there isn’t much to talk about besides his stature. He’s very small, and kinda looks like a 12-year-old who woke up with stubble one morning. He did have a mustache for a minute, which kinda made him look like the top half of a couple kids trying to sneak into a movie theater in a trench coat. The dadhat is replacement level, the dadlap (thanks to sansabelt is a tick above average for the era), and the hair is pure 70s child actor, which is absolutely fitting.

PRODcast 158′s Old School Player of the Week: Hugh YancyHugh…

PRODcast 158′s Old School Player of the Week: Hugh Yancy

Hugh Yancy was a second and third baseman who played in seven games spread across three major league seasons with the Chicago White Sox. In 1972, he played in three games, got nine ABs, hit a single, and that was that. In 1974 he pinch bunted. That’s all. And in 1976, he got 10 ABs, and ripped another single. Add all that up and you’ve got yourself a sweet .105 career BA, and an OPS+ of -23, which seems low.

Yancy ripped some easy 70 DADHAT, and while the look was ubiquitous in that era, he had a DGAF flair to his lid placement that was something to behold.

Yancy had the pleasure of playing in some absolutely ghastly Sox unis – the all-navy collared disasters that looked like coveralls for a pest control company or some off-brand freighting/delivery service, and the inexplicable red White Sox unis who were not the Red Sox but had red socks.

Hugh is now 69 years old.

He also looks like he could be the offspring of Eazy-E and Terrence Howard.